See Jane Lead Ways for Women to Take Charge at Work The workplace is changing From the boardrooms to non profit organizations to the military the typical male management style is now obsolete There is a new generation of employees who reject hierarchi

  • Title: See Jane Lead: 99 Ways for Women to Take Charge at Work
  • Author: Lois P. Frankel
  • ISBN: 9780446579681
  • Page: 420
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The workplace is changing From the boardrooms to non profit organizations to the military, the typical male management style is now obsolete There is a new generation of employees who reject hierarchical leadership and respond to the behaviors and characteristics that women traditionally exhibit In other words, the time for woment to take charge is now In SEE JANE LEADThe workplace is changing From the boardrooms to non profit organizations to the military, the typical male management style is now obsolete There is a new generation of employees who reject hierarchical leadership and respond to the behaviors and characteristics that women traditionally exhibit In other words, the time for woment to take charge is now In SEE JANE LEAD, Dr Frankel provides a blueprint for women who want to tap their natural leadership abilities and manage with greater ease and confidence in the business world, on the soccer field, at home, and beyond With the same sharp insight that she demonstrated in Nice Girls Don t Get Rich and Nice Girls Don t Get the Corner Office, Dr Frankel shows women how they can overcome sabotaging childhood behaviors that hold them back, while offering practical advice and real life examples of strong female leaders who have succeeded in male dominated fields beyond their wildest dreams.

    • Unlimited [Religion Book] » See Jane Lead: 99 Ways for Women to Take Charge at Work - by Lois P. Frankel ✓
      420 Lois P. Frankel
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Religion Book] » See Jane Lead: 99 Ways for Women to Take Charge at Work - by Lois P. Frankel ✓
      Posted by:Lois P. Frankel
      Published :2018-09-05T20:24:37+00:00

    One thought on “See Jane Lead: 99 Ways for Women to Take Charge at Work”

    1. I'm a little offended by some of the ideas presented in this book (it implies that if you can be a mother, you can be a manager) and by the way in which they were presented. I'd like to think that my years of education and experience are contributing somehow to my career. I did enjoy some of the profiles of succesful women. I'd recommend this book to a mother who is re-entering the workforce after a number of years as a feel-good confidence builder, but I don't think there's much in here for the [...]

    2. Nothing new here. Pragmatic book for junior or mid-career women. Some of these tips wouldn't work in some business cultures, knowing one's audience is key, which I don't think the author addressed. Not all environments are the same so universals rarely work in every instance. There is a fair amount of repetition and comparisons to parenting that was lost on me, but I can see the utility for others. However, I think this could be a very helpful book for a number of people working in organizations [...]

    3. There were a few good strategies that could be taken from the book. However, the author tried to relate a lot of work place experiences to how a woman might interact with her signifcant other and children. Overall, I'm a little disapointed that I purchased this book.

    4. I liked the idea of recognising non-traditional female leadership skills, but was alienated about how they were only recognised in female industries. Repetitve, and low on content or research.

    5. With a focus on revealing and solving the different attitudes that are under what is called "Nice Girls Syndrome", Lois P. Frankel developed this book to discuss the "feminization of leadership", i.e. how women can lead in the workplace without being called too bossy, aggressive or egotistical. Why is that? Lois believes that "nice girls have a particularly difficult time assuming leadership roles and doing it effectively. When they do, they often try to make everyone happy (which, as you know, [...]

    6. I borrowed this as an audiobook, and found that the target audience was a mid-career woman with traditional gender roles. Much of the book was written in short blurbs (the 99 tips), and I found useful the sections on leadership, assertiveness, team-building and coaching. I also appreciated the references to other useful business and leadership books. Where the book lost me was a lot of the assumed context of the reader as well as the last third of the book regarding entrepreneurship and raising [...]

    7. Really didn't feel any inspiration. But this was meant to be an informative read. I felt a little out of place since she brought up a lot of "mom" examples, so I couldn't relate to them.

    8. This was recommended and loaned to me by the only woman VP in my agency, who is also a mentor to me. I was initially wary about this book because I am usually fearful that management books geared to women will encourage them to adopt the skills and traits of the dominant male-based leadership model.This book was a balance between both worlds and really focused on the best aspects of each. Since the intended audience is women, there was a strong focus on using skills that typically come natural t [...]

    9. As this audio book started, I found myself rolling my eyes quite a bit. It just seemed too simplified, too contrived, even. However, as the third disc ended, I found that I did really enjoy it. While nothing seemed incredibly new, it was a good refresher and has me nodding in agreement. It also made me realize that even though I gave up my official manager role, I do think I am, legitimately, a leader (how cocky do I sound?!?). The book made me appreciate what I have to offer in the workplace, h [...]

    10. I read a few pages of this on my way into the city every morning. It inspires me to the point that I walk into my office ready to tackle the not so easy tasks, and I can do that with confidence.She discusses now important feminine power is in the workplace, how distinct it is, and how much energy women waste on trying to use a masculine power instead. Very insightful, not pushy and a fun read. I highly recommend it.

    11. Some of this book had really great information that I can add to my repertoire for leadership skills, and that I found extremely useful. There is also an assessment of your leadership strengths and opportunities that I liked. However, much of it I felt like I already know, or already put into practice. I think it would probably be better for someone who is newer to management/leadership positions.

    12. I like for the fact that this book can be read individually by each chapters and you don't need to read from chapter 1 to the end chronologically. There are some chapters that are more suited to me and I focus on absorbing the content of those chapters.This book is for women who are employees in a companies, who are managers finding ways to lead and manage their teams, moms raising their daughters.Overall a good book for women who are working and in different stages in their lives.

    13. I enjoyed reading this book and obtained many great take-aways. Dr. Frankel has a very readable writing style and although not syaing anything truly different from other leadership books, she phrases the ideas in means which I can easily grasp and apply. Good read for those starting careers as well because it's never too early to start leading.

    14. 3 stars.Some great insights on leadership for women, but this book is heavily geared toward wives and mothers. As a woman who is neither of these things, nearly a third of the book - and the 99 tips - are not relevant to my life. While the good stuff is good, it's definitely tailored to a specific type of woman in leadership.

    15. I appreciated how Frankel organized the book into tips, making it easy to work though nugget by nugget. I was surprised (in a good way) by the direction she took at the end when she started offering up tips for developing daughters who want to lead.

    16. A bit dry, but it's a book I could see myself coming back to down the road when/if I am managing a team of people. I would like to read her other books (the Nice Girl books) and see if I could learn a bit more from this author.

    17. Saw this in Borders the same time I bought "Nice Girls don't get the corner office", and I think I'll move on to that if Nice Girls turns out alright. It's been getting good ratings, and now that I'm in management, I need to pick up my game and get good pointers. I'm in need of a mentor!!!

    18. Another book that provides women with career guidance, this time the focus is one which positive behaviours one should employ in order too be taken seriously. Many of the tips touch on entrepreneurial behaviours which I found very interesting.

    19. I actually liked this book better than the other one I read. The stories of successful women were inspiring. Not too useful in a practical sense, though.

    20. Offensive book through over generalization. Her suggestions, like: make a plan, understand who your audience is, were applicable to anyone.

    21. I'm learning to implement some of tips on this book, since I haven't become in charge at my work now. My hope, one day I'll be in charge,I'm ready enough

    22. I couldn't finish the book word for word, I had to start scanning because I was getting bored, honestly.All in all, good advice.just too long winded.

    23. I liked that she boiled it down to 99 bullets of ways you can lead at work. Quick read just look at the highlights.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *