Scraping By Wage Labor Slavery and Survival in Early Baltimore Enslaved mariners white seamstresses Irish dockhands free black domestic servants and native born street sweepers all navigated the low end labor market in post Revolutionary Balti Seth Rockman co

  • Title: Scraping By: Wage Labor, Slavery, and Survival in Early Baltimore
  • Author: Seth Rockman
  • ISBN: 9780801890079
  • Page: 182
  • Format: Paperback
  • Enslaved mariners, white seamstresses, Irish dockhands, free black domestic servants, and native born street sweepers all navigated the low end labor market in post Revolutionary Balti Seth Rockman considers this diverse workforce, exploring how race, sex, nativity, and legal status determined the economic opportunities and vulnerabilities of working families in the eEnslaved mariners, white seamstresses, Irish dockhands, free black domestic servants, and native born street sweepers all navigated the low end labor market in post Revolutionary Balti Seth Rockman considers this diverse workforce, exploring how race, sex, nativity, and legal status determined the economic opportunities and vulnerabilities of working families in the early republic.In the era of Frederick Douglass, Balti s distinctive economy featured many slaves who earned wages and white workers who performed backbreaking labor By focusing his study on this boomtown, Rockman reassesses the roles of race and region and rewrites the history of class and capitalism in the United States during this time.Rockman describes the material experiences of low wage workers how they found work, translated labor into food, fuel, and rent, and navigated underground economies and social welfare systems He also explores what happened if they failed to find work or lost their jobs Rockman argues that the American working class emerged from the everyday struggles of these low wage workers Their labor was indispensable to the early republic s market revolution, and it was central to the transformation of the United States into the wealthiest society in the Western world.Rockman s research includes construction site payrolls, employment advertisements, almshouse records, court petitions, and the nation s first living wage campaign These rich accounts of day laborers and domestic servants illuminate the history of early republic capitalism and its consequences for working families.

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      Published :2019-02-27T22:56:37+00:00

    One thought on “Scraping By: Wage Labor, Slavery, and Survival in Early Baltimore”

    1. This is a fascinating look at the wage laborers at the very bottom of the economic food chain in the early 1800s. Historians have written about the artisans in this time period, but for the most part have neglected the poorest of the poor - women who do the wash and work as seamstresses, men who constantly worked to dredge the Baltimore Harbor or were "street scrapers" (use your imagination - horses were the basic mode of transport, so what do you think they were scraping?) Baltimore was an espe [...]

    2. The city of Baltimore was a grim and brutal place for helpless wage labourers who struggled daily in the early decades of the new nation. It was survival of the fittest for these workers who toiled as best they could in the capitalist jungles that were America’s cities. Historian Seth Rockman sets this cruel scene time and again in his book Scraping By: Wage Labor, Slavery, and Survival in Early Baltimore through exhibiting the horrendous conditions experienced by low-wage workers between 179 [...]

    3. This is a community study of Baltimore's indigent during the early republic. Rockman is challenging the notion that the early republic was a time of great growth and upward opportunity for people. Baltimore was a unique border city, and employers used a combination of slave and poor white labor to their advantage to fill temporary jobs. Rockman does an excellent job resurrecting the lives of these very poor people, and shows how there was little mobility for these people. Also shows how slavery [...]

    4. This is a very detailed account of early 19th century Baltimore. It's interesting how many groups of people are involved in the overall city and how they intertwine. But it's not my favorite topic to read about. I had to for a class.

    5. In Scraping By Seth Rockman draws a portrait of the urban underclass in Baltimore in the early decades of the American republic. He argues that socially and economically Baltimore can stand as a relevant case study from which to draw broader conclusions about both place and period; a seaport on international trade lines located at the crossroads of the North and South and a rapidly growing early republic boom town with little colonial heritage. Rockman assembles an account of the casual and coer [...]

    6. the growth of American capitalism in early Republican Baltimore. Wage labor built the city, and in Baltimore, due to its position between North and South, the population of those 'scraping by' was more complex and more diverse than in most other cities in the nation. Examines the hidden labor of early American Society, slaves working for day wages, women performing domestic work, dredgers cleaning out the harbor, all of whom were too transient, or too poor to be recorded in the census, and whose [...]

    7. Very informative and well-researched, and it doesn't exclude anyone when talking about the early American working class- European immigrants, African-Americans in various stages of freedom and slavery, poor whites, women, etc. While it focuses on worker conditions, it also shows how the American economy developed and became more capitalist and competitive. Some of the worker's rights/living wage issues are very applicable to economics today.The only complaint would be that Rockman isn't a very s [...]

    8. Interesting to see all of the moving parts within an urban environment, and to especially see how the institution of slavery fits in. Also an excellent treatment on the place of free women and children in that complex labor environment. I wasn't that familiar with urban slavery outside of Douglass' Narrative. Interested to read more.

    9. A very academic book on the history and culture of labor in the early American republic. I thought it was well-written and informative. It's not a casual read by any stretch of the imagination. It's very good for its subject. I only gave it a low rating because it's not a book I would read on my own for pleasure, but it's a very good specialized history book.

    10. This book makes the broad point that the underclass we see today is not an aberration but an outgrowth of a long tradition in American political economy. The details provide richness rather than boredom. That said, a few quotes are repeated, and lists of legal indemnities for various classes are repeated without added detail. This takes away from the book's professionalism and momentum.

    11. A very Slow book About the early 1800s Baltimore Maryland.Seth Rockman Repeat himself for most of the book, After he tells you three or four times you finally get the idea. Although it's an informative book, Early wage labor and slave labor exist involved in Baltimore

    12. This is an excellent history of labor. Rockman looks at those at the very bottom: mudscrapers, piece workers, domestic servants, enslaved people, etc. He devotes a lot of space to women and free people of color, making the book well-rounded.

    13. solid book about baltimore in the early 19th c. If you already know that slavery and capitalism are compatible then not spectacular.

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