Madame Mao The White Boned Demon This is the most complete and authoritative account of the childhood and tumultuous life of Jiang Qing from her early years as an aspiring actress to her marriage and partnership with Mao Zedong the

  • Title: Madame Mao: The White-Boned Demon
  • Author: Ross Terrill
  • ISBN: 9780804729222
  • Page: 151
  • Format: Paperback
  • This is the most complete and authoritative account of the childhood and tumultuous life of Jiang Qing, from her early years as an aspiring actress to her marriage and partnership with Mao Zedong, the controversial years of power after Mao s death, her final years of disgrace and imprisonment, and her suicide in 1991.

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      Posted by:Ross Terrill
      Published :2018-06-12T19:14:54+00:00

    One thought on “Madame Mao: The White-Boned Demon”

    1. Fascinating, absolutely fascinating. It's a detailed (394 pages) psychohistory of Jiang Qing, Mao's wife, casting her as a product of her place and gender: a poor girl with a rebellious streak turned actress and political dabbler turned the most powerful Communist woman ever. Terrill's take of Jiang Qing is that she was an eternal child, blending her personal life (daughter of a concubine, bullied, cast out by her father, marrying four times) and theater life (passionate, vain, elevating acting [...]

    2. Excellent novel about the life of Jian Qing, Mao's fourth and last wife. A former Shanghai actress and call-girl, Qing was petty, vicious and vengeful. When she came to power during the Cultural Revolution, she hijacked Chinese arts to deliver her violent revolutionary message. She also persecuted all her reall or presumed enemies dating back to the 1930s. After Mao died she took power with the infamous Gang of Power, and was overthrown by the reformers who eventually would put Deng Xiao Ping in [...]

    3. Jiang Qing, although not awesome, was awesome. That sounds dumb, but read the book and you'll know what I mean.

    4. Although Madame Mao was ruthless and often cruel (definitely vindictive) in clawing her way to the top, her refusal to confess when accused of crimes gave her existence value, in my opinion. The Chinese Communist Party can rewrite truth, a la 1984, and if an accused doesn't confess, he isn't a good Communist. Madame Mao was defiant to the end since she always believed herself right. This was such a refreshing change from the norm. Although she was selfish and self-centered, the Chinese needed a [...]

    5. Madame Mao (Paperback) by Ross TerrillCover's in rough condition, otherwise very good.Biography, covering events from 1915-1970's. Well referenced with bibliography.

    6. This book is the history of Jiang Qing AKA Madame Mao who was known to her enemies as the White Boned Demon. Who started life as Li Yunhe grew up in an abusive household where her father was a well to do carpenter and her mother was a concubine who like in the book becoming Madame Mao was a victim of the old imperial China. But she would not sit quietly and let life get the better of her and would throughout her young life would live with her grandparents and run away to become a young actress a [...]

    7. Reading The Wild Swans has started me on a journey to learn more about modern China. This story of Jiang Qing, aka Madame Mao, began to add flesh to the bones of a woman who has never been more than a name to me. In reading her story I learned as much about the China of her lifetime as about her. For instance, consider the (to a Westerner) astonishing fact that her mother's name is not known. She -- Jiang's mother -- was a concubine and of such little consequence in society that there is no reco [...]

    8. This was a slow read but it built as it went along, telling the previously unheard and more or less unbiased story of Jiang Qing aka Lan Ping aka Madame Mao from her childhood to death. It is edifying to learn about her role in many events in modern China especially the "Cultural Revolution". The research seems solid and incorporates many interviews with people who were there such as her second husband Tang Na (or was he her 3rd?). This is also a good book to fight the typically male-centered hi [...]

    9. A history heavy on speculative psychology. Missing many important events--like the Great Leap Forward debacle and the Hundred Flowers double-cross--and necessary details (especially the human costs of the aforementioned and the Cultural Revolution). It's fascinating, nonetheless: a portrait of a party of one--a shallow, rather uninteresting party of one swept up in events and times way out of her league and beyond her comprehension.

    10. Inside look at the insanity that was Maoist China and the dangers of government by cult of personality.

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