La Capture du sombre Invited to a quiet Swiss chateau by the enigmatic Tatiana Beaujeu Lehmann Anne begins to slowly write a novel in a language that is not hers a language that makes meaning foreign and keeps her alert

  • Title: La Capture du sombre
  • Author: Nicole Brossard
  • ISBN: 9782760932883
  • Page: 324
  • Format: None
  • Invited to a quiet Swiss chateau by the enigmatic Tatiana Beaujeu Lehmann, Anne begins to slowly write a novel in a language that is not hers, a language that makes meaning foreign and keeps her alert to the world and its fiery horizon Will the strange intoxication that takes hold of her and her characters sculptor Charles his sister, Kim, about to leave for the far Invited to a quiet Swiss chateau by the enigmatic Tatiana Beaujeu Lehmann, Anne begins to slowly write a novel in a language that is not hers, a language that makes meaning foreign and keeps her alert to the world and its fiery horizon Will the strange intoxication that takes hold of her and her characters sculptor Charles his sister, Kim, about to leave for the far north and Laure Ravin, a lawyer obsessed with the Patriot Act allow her to break through the darkness of the world

    • [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ☆ La Capture du sombre : by Nicole Brossard ↠
      324 Nicole Brossard
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ☆ La Capture du sombre : by Nicole Brossard ↠
      Posted by:Nicole Brossard
      Published :2018-08-15T11:34:06+00:00

    One thought on “La Capture du sombre”

    1. A recent review I wrote for Boston Review's footnotes:There are several worthwhile topics to discuss in Brossard’s newest from Coach House, Fences in Breathing. There are the real-life social implications to the imaginary war that ends the novella, the importance of pleasure (Jennifer Moxley described pleasure as “the word that first comes to mind at the mention of Nicole Brossard’s poetry”), and the associations between language, body, and desire. Yet it is the idea of translation that [...]

    2. The difficult thing about reviewing this book is that, as a work of "innovative writing," there's truthfully not much plot beyond what's already given in the book description. Still, it's a strangely enjoyable read, not for the characters or the plot, but for the language. It's obvious Brossard is a poet, and in a way this book should probably be viewed more as prose poetry than as a novel. It touches on themes of translation, women's writing, and the post-9/11 age of the war on terror, all of w [...]

    3. HATED it. Especially the passage where she deliberately withholds the use of punctuation. You cannot have all of your characters talking simultaneously in a confused jumble and expect the reader to understand exactly WHAT is going on. Maybe that is the point. But as a reader, I don't want to have to play connect the 1000 dot puzzles when I read. I'm fine to bridge the gap and fill things in on my own, but the entire story was just one big "what the FUCK did I just read". I think the fact that it [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *