The Forgotten Planet The story of an experiment gone wrong a planet seeded with primitive bacterial plant and insect life forms then forgotten until a spaceship crash lands stranding its crew The crew must fight to su

  • Title: The Forgotten Planet
  • Author: Murray Leinster
  • ISBN: 9780517554128
  • Page: 286
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The story of an experiment gone wrong a planet seeded with primitive bacterial, plant, and insect life forms, then forgotten until a spaceship crash lands, stranding its crew The crew must fight to survive in a savage nightmare world From the Hugo Award winning author, Murray Leinster.

    • ô The Forgotten Planet || ☆ PDF Download by é Murray Leinster
      286 Murray Leinster
    • thumbnail Title: ô The Forgotten Planet || ☆ PDF Download by é Murray Leinster
      Posted by:Murray Leinster
      Published :2018-09-16T18:51:47+00:00

    One thought on “The Forgotten Planet”

    1. There is a wonderful old term used to describe a feature of Golden Age science fiction novels: BEM, an acronym for "bug-eyed monsters." Back in the 1930s and '40s, you see, the covers of many sci-fi pulp magazines featured illustrations of bulbous-orbed, invariably menacing aliens and other creatures; just do a Google Image search for the "Thrilling Wonder Stories" periodical and you'll see what I mean! But anyone wanting to actually READ a book with more BEMs than any 10 other sci-fi books of t [...]

    2. I picked this up based on a glowing review from one of my favorite writers, Bruce Jones. I only made it a little over halfway through the book (117/209 pages) before deciding to put it down. There just isn't any overarching plot. Is it too much to ask of a sci-fi story to include some fantastic contraptions, plot twists and a few memorable characters? Instead we get a study on nearly mute cavemen and their development as a species. This was fun the first time, but the 4th time I read about how " [...]

    3. This book contains three novelettes: THE MAD PLANET, THE RED DUST, and NIGHTMARE PLANET, collected from the pulps. The story takes place thirty thousand years after the 20th century, and into the second Carboniferous Period. Insects are now giants, even larger than they were in the first Carboniferous Period. Our hero is Burl, a simple man little more than a savage. In THE MAD PLANET we meet Burl as he forages in the large toadstools looking for food, a naked human who only exist for food. He’ [...]

    4. My last read of 2017 happens to be a good one. It concludes the series that started with The Mad Planet and The Red Dust. I enjoyed it but was a little disappointed and confused that they retconned the planet being Earth and instead made it a planet that was being terraformed and just wasn't completed. This time the humans got there when a large spaceship crashed. We never get more detail and are only told that it happened 40 generations ago. It starts with the tribe having to flee the valley th [...]

    5. If, like me, you hate bugs you're really going to find this a terrifying read. Leinster really knows how to capture the realism, particularly with giant spiders devouring their prey. *shudder*

    6. 4/5: Quick and easy read. It's like what would have happened in the months following the proto-human's enlightenment by the black monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

    7. ‘A ship is marooned on a planet whose existence has been mislaid by the galactic bureaucracy. And the planet’s ecology has gone wild, breeding deadly giant insects. the ship’s crew and passengers have no hope of rescue. Can they and their descendents (sic) survive? Tune in next millennium.’Blurb from the 2003 Baen paperback editionThis is a fix-up novel composed of three rewritten stories ‘The Mad Planet’ (Argosy 1920), ‘The Red Dust’ (Argosy 1921), and ‘Nightmare Planet’ (Sc [...]

    8. A delightful book. While human beings are spreading throughout the galaxy, they find a sterile planet, decide to colonize and seed it with terrestrial life forms (bacteria, fungi, plants and invertebrates). But somewhere around the process, the planet information is mislaid and the planet is forgotten. The ecology is thus left to evolve by itself. When a human ship gets shipwrecked in the area, they save themselves in the planet, which they find infested by giant insects and spiders, the results [...]

    9. This book was fantastic. In it we have a caveman story with intelligent social commentary that was neither outputting nor heavy handed. The basic precept of the story is strange and science fictiony, yet believable. And the book is populated with characters you can't help but root for. But there are two things about this book that really set it apart and force me to love it. The first is this book has almost no dialogue, but so talented is Murray Leinster's skill of description that you don't ca [...]

    10. I downloaded a free audio recording of this book, not really having any expectations. It sounded vaguely interesting, it was free, and I could listen to it at work.I was rewarded with a phenomenal piece of work that is totally worth the read and/or listen. I was fascinated to see the development of the characters, the sudden interest and exploration of their world, and the breakthroughs that they make. There are so many subtle changes over the course of the novel that in and of themselves have h [...]

    11. A primitive band of humans, the descendants of the passengers on a crashed spaceliner, struggle to survive on a planet ruled by giant insects, the result of an incomplete terraforming project. Separated from his tribe, young Burl begins to think in new ways and eventually leads his people to a better life. Murray Leinster's entertaining story is lifted a notch above the pulp novel by his vivid and well-researched descriptions of insect life. These people live in a lonely, nightmarish world of me [...]

    12. This is another book I read for The Defining Science Fiction Books of the 1950s challenge I'm doing. This is from 1954 and the story line is actually pretty good, even by today's standards, though the writing is still somewhat dated. I enjoyed this. The premise is of a planet that was partially terraformed and then forgotten about before the process was finished. The only thing alive on the planet were insects and lower life-forms, and they have grown to monstrous dimensions. Imagine a beetle th [...]

    13. This is an exciting futuristic, survival thriller. It would make a great moviecially in 3-D. This book came out a while ago.n't agree with the 1984 publish dateI'm 63 and I read this book in Junior High School1961?? it has all the properties of some of our recent sci-fi movies I've seen.d I have always been a sci-fi, monster buff since childhoodThe beginning, how the crew has to land on the nearest planet, after the ship is struck by meteors is exactly like the intro scenes in "Pitch Black".e Vi [...]

    14. A primitive band of humans, the descendants of the passengers on a crashed spaceliner, struggle to survive on a planet ruled by giant insects, the result of an incomplete terraforming project. Separated from his tribe, young Burl begins to think in new ways and eventually leads his people to a better life. Murray Leinster's entertaining story is lifted a notch above the pulp novel by his vivid and well-researched descriptions of insect life. These people live in a lonely, nightmarish world of me [...]

    15. There is a wonderful old term used to describe a feature of Golden Age science fiction novels: BEM, an acronym for “bug-eyed monsters.” Back in the 1930s and ‘40s, you see, the covers of many sci-fi pulp magazines featured illustrations of bulbous-orbed, invariably menacing aliens and other creatures; just do a Google Image search for the Thrilling Wonder Stories periodical and you’ll see what I mean! But anyone wanting to actually READ a book with more BEMs than any 10 other sci-fi book [...]

    16. This is a true classic of the Golden Age of SF in every sense of the world. This version combines stories written in the 1920's and the final segment in the 1950's. As I recall, it was used during the 1960's in high school biology classes because it's accurate depiction of insects, spider and fungi. BEM's of course, but a romping adventure through a unique world. I first read this when I was perhaps 10 or 11 years old, and it was as much fun today when I'm in my 60's. Don't expect literary excel [...]

    17. The Survey-Ship Tethys made the first landing on the planet, which had no name. It was an admirable planet in many ways. It had an ample atmosphere and many seas, which the nearby sun warmed so lavishly that a perpetual cloud-bank hid them and most of the solid ground from view. It had mountains and continents and islands and high plateaus. It had day and night and wind and rain, and its mean temperature was within the range to which human beings could readily accommodate. It was rather on the t [...]

    18. This was an interesting (an fairly quick) read. It was available freely through Project Gutenberg, though I'm not sure if I would have been happy paying for the book. Though the setup is sci-fi, it is not really a sci-fi book. The ending was a bit quick and disappointing (suffering from a sever case of Deus Ex Machina), but the rest of the story is quite enjoyable.

    19. An enjoyable enough read. Fans of E. R. Burroughs might like this one, I suppose. Not a whole lot happens but the events that do occur unfold satisfactory. Light on dialogue. Two once-in-centuries events coinciding in the finale seem a bit of a stretch but oh well.

    20. I had a hard time with this book. Neither the characters, including Burl the hero, or the world interested me very much.

    21. I found the ending disappointing and a little glib. Otherwise, I thought it was an enjoyable read.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *