Finding Abbey The Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave When the great environmental writer Edward Abbey died in four of his friends buried him secretly in a hidden desert spot that no one would ever find The final resting place of the Thoreau of the

  • Title: Finding Abbey: The Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave
  • Author: Sean Prentiss
  • ISBN: 9780826355911
  • Page: 401
  • Format: Paperback
  • When the great environmental writer Edward Abbey died in 1989, four of his friends buried him secretly in a hidden desert spot that no one would ever find The final resting place of the Thoreau of the American West remains unknown and has become part of American folklore In this book a young writer who went looking for Abbey s grave combines an account of his quest withWhen the great environmental writer Edward Abbey died in 1989, four of his friends buried him secretly in a hidden desert spot that no one would ever find The final resting place of the Thoreau of the American West remains unknown and has become part of American folklore In this book a young writer who went looking for Abbey s grave combines an account of his quest with a creative biography of Abbey.Sean Prentiss takes readers across the country as he gathers clues from his research, travel, and interviews with some of Abbey s closest friends including Jack Loeffler, Ken Seldom Seen Sleight, David Petersen, and Doug Peacock Along the way, Prentiss examines his own sense of rootlessness as he attempts to unravel Abbey s complicated legacy, raising larger questions about the meaning of place and home.

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      Posted by:Sean Prentiss
      Published :2018-06-18T03:57:49+00:00

    One thought on “Finding Abbey: The Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave”

    1. Those interested in Abbey will be drawn to this book for any nuggets of information and additions to the canon of an author sorely missed. Interviews with some of Abbey's closest friends that have survived him, like David Petersen, Doug Peacock and Ken Sleight are the highlights of this book. Of much less interest, are the author's repetitive refrains about the dissatisfaction he feels with his job and life in the city, and what feels like an all consuming need for the reader, and perhaps himsel [...]

    2. A magical talePrentiss spins a magical tale of searching for a dream, and chasing after the ghost of a legend. His search carries him deep into the desert, as well as deep into his own soul.

    3. Because I find Edward Abbey such an intriguing character, I was excited to find Finding Abbey: The Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave by Sean Prentiss. However, in many ways, this title is a bit misleading, as Prentiss isn't really just looking for Abbey's grave -- he is looking to find out more about the elusive figure of Abbey himself and indeed, find answers about his own life.Prentiss starts his journey in Home, Pennsylvania, looking for the graves of Abbey's family. It's a [...]

    4. **** 1/2 I really loved this book though had I been in a different mood, the navel gazing couldn't have worn on me. What surprised me most of all is what a great biography of Edward Abbey it turned out to be and the interviews with his friends were gems.

    5. Author Sean Prentiss put in thousand sof miles making interview connections and visiting old Ed Abbey haunts while researching Finding Abbey. Author Sean Prentiss put in thousands of miles making interview connections and visiting old Ed Abbey haunts while researching Finding Abbey.It took me a while to warm up to Finding Abbey: The Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave‘s thesis and its narrator, Sean Prentiss. I told myself I’d give it until page fifty, and that turned out to [...]

    6. "One of the beautiful things about Abbey's burial is that it keeps his anarchist spirit alive" (97).Some other reviewers found the author's introspection self-indulgent, but I was riveted by his story and related deeply to his feelings about city and suburban life versus the Western landscape and habitat he so clearly worships. The interviews with Abbey's friends were just as fascinating, exposing the man, not the myth, in all his contradictions, complexity, and occasional downright offensivenes [...]

    7. A contemplative and personal account of Prentiss’ search for the environmental activist and anarchist. Prentiss searches not just for Abbey’s secret, illegal grave in the desert, but also for explanations of Abbey’s life and character, and even for insight into his own life and yearnings. Beginning in Abbey’s hometown of Indiana, Pennsylvania, Prentiss visits Abbey’s stops across the US, leading always to the desert southwest and Abbey’s fame and true love in the trackless desert. He [...]

    8. Deft blending of substantive information about Edward Abbey alongside the writer's subjective search for defining and finding "home." Look forward to going back and analyzing how he made this book so suspenseful. Love how he writes about landscape. He's not a birder, but a phainopepla makes an appearance, which stirred this birder's heart!

    9. Overall I enjoyed this book but it got a little exhausting at times- the author repetitively whined throughout the book about wanting to go out west, missing the mountains. Other than that, very interesting interviews and descriptions.

    10. Nicely done mix of memoir and biography. While Prentiss is ostensibly looking for Ed Abbey's grave, at the same time he's trying to find himself in a quintessential Abbeyesque way. Good look at the man and some of his friends.

    11. The author writes a probing travelogue as he tracks thorough the places and people with whom Abbey spent his life. Like me, Prentiss approaches the complex mix of progressive environmentalist and narrow-minded scoundrel that made up Abbey in an attempt to understand. The author does recount finding the hidden grave, ending the book with only a quote from the man himself in true Abbey style: "Walk, better yet crawl, on hands and knees, over the sandstone and through the thorn bush and cactus. Whe [...]

    12. I really enjoyed this book. As an adventure book/memoir, it works well, as the author has a clear purpose in his journey. Well, two, really: 1) to find the hidden desert grave of his favorite author, Edward Abbey, and 2) find his own purpose and place in life. There are plenty of criticisms of this book stating that Prentiss is too busy "navel-gazing" and lamenting his lot in life. And sure, he does certainly ruminate on the trajectory of his life and how he -- a mountain-climber, adventurer, an [...]

    13. If you have read any of Edward Abbey's books, and in particular "The Monkey Wrench Gang" and "Desert Solitaire", you should read this book. It documents the author's personal search for the secret final resting place of one of America's most well-known authors, educators, environmental activists, and occasional eco-saboteur. Along the way, he interviews some of Abbey's closest personal friends and members of his inner circle - all interesting characters in their own right and a few noted authors [...]

    14. Another great read I had in MCB. Did they find his grave? They say they did, but as any Abbey fan can tell you, who knows what's true and not true about the desert curmudgeon? And is his body REALLY under that slab out in the middle of nowhere, or, as I prefer to say, the middle of everywhere? From :When the great environmental writer Edward Abbey died in 1989, four of his friends buried him secretly in a hidden desert spot that no one would ever find. The final resting place of the Thoreau of t [...]

    15. An enjoyable and easy read.He travels through several really great places in Colorado, Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico. A fan of the Southwest will enjoy following his progress from place to place. The interviews with Abbey's friends are the best part. They talk about their friendship with Abbey, adventures, Abbey's flaws, and why they kept his secrets. I never thought Abbey was a perfect person; I do like his writing, but I do not agree with all of his points. Abbey's friends' stories confirmed m [...]

    16. My grad school friend Sean has written a stellar adventure/biography/memoir that showcases not only the radical environmental leanings of Edward Abbey as seen through the eyes of his surviving friends and family, but also our generation's struggle with environmentalism and the meaning of place and home. I taught this in a nature writing class full of English majors and creative writers, and I also taught an excerpt in a non-English Honors course that was examining the notion of sustainable citie [...]

    17. A must-read for any Edward Abbey fans. They search for Abbey's hidden desert grave is interwoven with stories from Abbey's life, relationships, rambles and writing. In doing so, Sean Prentiss weaves a narrative of his own which in many ways parallels Abbey's own life. The dialogue is rich, the interviews and characters compelling, and the American Southwest is eloquently descriptive. I put books I've read into two categories - the donation box for the library, and my bookshelf to give to someone [...]

    18. Why would anyone care to trace Edward Abbey? You have just got to love the SW and the Southwest if a beautiful desert with mountains, arroyos and mesas. The vegetation is lovely and the ruins can be found most everywhere. It is dry, but what is the problem?They did find him in his grave and they found him. The author found more than just his grave site. The story follows him from his birthplace in Pennsylvania through his mid years where he held all kinds of menial work finally though his contac [...]

    19. Deeply engaging read, and hopefully not just because I can relate to the writers' central quest. It's not so much a search for Abbey's personal grave, but using the deep exploration of his roots and life as a means to explore what's important to him, and where to go in his life. Maybe it struck a chord in me, and maybe that's why I rate it so high. Your mileage may vary. But his non-flowery prose, full of openness and honesty, is something I appreciated, as that somehow captured the beauty and p [...]

    20. I read everything about Abbey so this book was a memory jog. It was not easy deciding if I liked it as I quickly became bored with the author's indulgent mid life crisis. Look just get over it, it's beyond you, find a partner that will put life in the forefront and get on with living. You you have more than most can dream of. There were some redeeming chapters and I think he did pin down the Abbey legend as best as it can be. Happy to read Prentiss is living in Vermont and is happy. The obsessio [...]

    21. A personal journey opens up in the quest to find a secret grave: an interesting, insightful book that Abbey-philes will enjoy, though I felt the writing often aspires to the literary heights of his hero and falls a bit short. Still, an an admirable quest and struggle to make sense of his own world in the journey to find the grave.

    22. If you are a Edward Abbey fan I would have to rate this book as a must read. Sean manages to interview all of Abbey's inner circle. It is interesting to hear their remembrances of Abbey 20 years after his passing. We need Abbey's voice now more than ever.

    23. Interesting book. Different than my normal reads. I learned a lot about Abbey-someone I knew nothing about-though indirectly. I did love the touches of "home" as the author is a cousin and the journey. If you are interested in a journey through life, give this a try

    24. Very peculiar book to read while in New York City, given Abbey's views on cities. Also very peculiar premise: Looking for Edward Abbey's grave--somewhere in the deserts of the Southwest. I wouldn't give away the ending, but the book made me want to get back to the deserts.

    25. Misleading reviews and over priced.To much self evaluating and comparing of himself to Abbey. What, after all this love and time spent on and at Abbey's 4 corners , he moves to Vermont.

    26. I went back and forth on this. Sometimes it was too talky about the author's feelings but then the actual source material, interviews, and wrapping up were quite powerful. Glad I read it. If you love Edward Abbey, it's worth it. If you don't, skip it.

    27. The author searches for Abbey's hidden grave while coming to terms with the way he wants to live a tad arcane. And only for die hard fans of Abbey.

    28. totally informative of edward abbey, the man and the author's search for his own place in the world as well as the place of abbey in the world and his actual grave site

    29. They did find the grave somewhere in "Abbey Country" desert. The book is mostly a bio of Edward Abbey and his writings.

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